Gloria Gets Motion Sickness (guest post from Seth Brown)

May 2, 2007

Doing something literary when you’re inspired is great. But doing something literary consistently, even on days you’re not inspired? That’s hard work.

When I first heard about Inkberry, I was very excited. Granted, this was because I thought it was something I could eat. But even after someone explained to me that it was a literary cabal generally consisting of people who didn’t want to be eaten, it still seemed like a pretty neat idea — even moreso than digital watches. I’m glad there’s a literary force in the Shire (as I like to refer to the Berkshires), and doubly glad that it happens to be headquartered in my city.

It’s not easy to keep literary things going for any significant period of time. I had a political poetry column in the Providence Journal for a few years, but it ended in the middle of my college career. I co-founded a humor magazine at Williams, but then I foolishly graduated. I have a blog on RisingPun.com that I mean to update regularly but end up updating in fits and starts. Mostly fits. I used to do improvised verse at the 413 poetry slams until they ended. Sic transit gloria. (Or for those who don’t speak Latin, “Gloria gets motion sickness”)

The point is, doing something literary when you’re inspired is great. But doing something literary consistently, even on days you’re not inspired? That’s hard work. Sometimes, it’s even too great a task for one writer to face alone.

So, what do you do when faced with an overwhelming task? Well, you have two options. The first is the option I take: Cheat. I’m not inspired for a post on my blog right now, so I’m going to steal this Inkberry blog entry of mine to paste on my website as well. But that’s not a long-term solution. The other option is to seek help. How fortuitous that you have a local literary cabal that puts on events and even offers a wide range of courses.

Me? I pretty much just offer humor. As a course when there’s demand, on my website even when there isn’t, and in my column in the Transcript until the editor wakes up one day and announces he’s leaving for Bennington. (Seriously, if it happens a third time, I’m going to suspect a conspiracy.)

In conclusion, buy low and sell high. And feel free to replace “low” with “my books”.

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